Date/Time
Date(s) - September 20, 2019
7:30 pm - 10:00 pm

Location
The Fuse Factory Electronic and Digital Arts Lab


On the evening of Friday, September 20th we are proud to present bassist/composer/improviser Kyle Motl (NYC) and multi-instrumentalist Caleb Miller and Nick Weckman’s experimental electronic duo project Sun Trash (CMH); additional performers tbd. Doors 7:30, BYOB, all ages. $5-$10.

About the artists:

Kyle Motl is a bassist, composer, and improviser dedicated to the performance of creative music. His work explores aspects of chaos and complexity through involved rhythmic and spectral transformations while remaining grounded in an embodied approach to performance. Kyle regularly gives solo concerts which expand upon the vast timbral resources of the contrabass. Kyle is active in a number of ensembles across the field of creative and improvised music, including Sibarg Ensemble (improvisation at the intersection of jazz and classical Persian music), Peter Kuhn Trio, Abbey Rader Trio and Quartet, Kyle Motl Trio, and Treesearch with Keir GoGwilt. His trio record with Kjell Nordeson and Tobin Chodos, Panjandrums, appeared on Best-of-2017 lists on the Free Jazz Blog and Perfect Sound Forever. He maintains regular duo projects with Keir GoGwilt, Drew Ceccato, TJ Borden, and Tommy Babin. Kyle has performed and recorded alongside artists including Anthony Davis, Kidd Jordan, Mary Halvorson, Roscoe Mitchell, and Wadada Leo Smith, among others. Touring frequently, Kyle’s music has been performed at numerous venues, festivals, and conferences, including the International Society of Bassists Convention, the Darmstadt Fereinkurse, Bass2018 Lucca, the International Society for Improvised Music Conference, NUNC!3, Festival Internacional de Música Experimental, and the Subtropics biannual.

Sun Trash is process music/friendship duo of Nick Weckman and Caleb Miller based in Columbus, OH. We strive to make something together.

Gerard Cox (b. 1976) is a pianist and drummer from Columbus with a keen interest in musical surrealism and the percussive nature of the piano. Born to a piano teacher Mom and a jazz saxophone hobbyist father, clear “rockstar” inclinations were shown at age 8 in an appearance as J.S. Bach at an OMTA music festival and at 10 as Billy Idol in a look-a-like contest for the national pop/rock magazine Star Hits. Cox developed a love for jazz in high school on through college, studying both jazz piano and B3 organ. While initially taken with the straight-ahead jazz of Art Blakey and Clifford Brown, he followed John Coltrane’s discography into his later period music and this proved to be the gateway for a fascination with free jazz and all kinds of other outsider/experimental music.

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