Performance: An evening with Noa Even (CLE) with O(f)verandas (CMH)
October 26, 2019

On the evening of Saturday, October 26th we are proud to present experimental saxophonist Noa Even (CLE) and experimental electric guitarist Bernard Iannone’s solo project O(f)Verandas. Doors 8:00, BYOB, all ages. $5-$10.

About the artists:

Noa Even is a Cleveland-based saxophonist dedicated to sparking deeper interest in the arts of today through the performance of contemporary music. She is a co-founder and the Executive Director of Cleveland Uncommon Sound Project (CUSP), a non-profit organization aimed at strengthening the artistic engagement of the Northeast Ohio community by championing the creation and performance of new music.

O(f)verandas is the experimental ambient guitar and electronic music project of Bernard Iannone since 2011. His sounds have been described as Experimental drone panoramas, otherworldly guitar loops, and psychedelic ambient collage.

November 2019 Frequency Fridays: Robbie Lynn Hunsinger (TN) + Keenan Lawler (KY) + Forced Into Femininity (ORD) + John and C Mehrl Bennett (CMH)
November 01, 2019

Our November 2019 Frequency Fridays show features oboist/interactive artist Robbie Lynn Hunsinger, multi-instrumentalist/improviser/composer/sound artist Keenan Lawler, performance artist Jill Flanagan’s project Forced Into Femininity, and spoken word artists John and C Mehrl Bennett. Date: Friday, November 1st 2019. Location: The Columbus Cultural Arts Center, 139 W. Main St. 43215. Admission: free. Doors open 7:00pm. All ages. Our Frequency Fridays 2018-2019 season is supported by grants from the Greater Columbus Arts Council, the Ohio Arts Council, and the Columbus Foundation.

About the artists:

Robbie Lynn Hunsinger had an illustrious career as a classical oboist before becoming a cutting edge interactive artist and multimedia performer. She was an obbligato soloist with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, toured France as an oboe d’amore soloist with The Robert Shaw Institute and toured Europe with the Chicago and Atlanta Symphony Orchestras. Hunsinger dove into Chicago’s free jazz experience in the 90′s. She added Chinese and Indian oboes to her quiver as well as single reeded and invented horns. She studied composition and improvisation with Roscoe Mitchell as a Resident Artist at the Atlantic Center for the Arts, and was featured in duets with Evan Parker at Chicago’s Empty Bottle Festival and FMP Festival. She played the Chicago Jazz Festival and World Music Festivals with Tatsu Aoki and performed with Pauline Oliveros, Joe McPhee, Ken Vandermark, Kent Kessler, Davu Seru, Avreeayl Ra, Harrison Bankhead and Fred Lomberg-Holm. Her “Trio” recording with Tatsu and legendary Art Ensemble member Joseph Jarman garnered a 4 star review from Downbeat Magazine and was featured on several top 10 playlists.

R Keenan Lawler is a Louisville, Kentucky based multi-instrumentalist, improviser, composer, and sound artist. For nearly four decades he has been a restless explorer of sound, and maker of music that literally and figuratively falls between the cracks. From a crash course of learning the guitar in the post-punk era to fire music inspired improvisation , live sampling performances and generative sound installations concerning concepts of spatiality and hypnagogia. Since the late nineties, he is best known for developing a highly idiosyncratic language on the metal bodied resonator guitar, extending its timbral and harmonic range far outside the usual role in bluegrass or blues. Following a long held fascination with microtonal music systems, Lawler also utilizes a 19 tone equal temperament acoustic, just intonation electric guitar, and OSX and IOS applications.

Jill Lloyd Flanagan aka Forced Into Femininity describes her newest album simply: “‘Erraticism’ is a phrase appropriated from the Terfy feminist writer Mary Daly. To me, it’s a way of taking the way female art and especially trans art is dismissed and trivialized as not worthy of being taken seriously into a philosophy and intention. It’s an act of resistance against ‘Real Music’, ‘Real Art’ and the complacent way they approach our horrific present.” Forced Into Femininity is an important and uncompromising voice in the modern underground, and her music is a disorienting storm of ever-shifting electronics and theatrical, dizzying vocals. Flanagan once described her work as “Marxist Body Horror,” and, honestly, nothing can top that.

John M. Bennett has been (and continues to be) a prolific author and publisher of avant garde poetry and experimental writing. He is an active and inspirational member of the contemporary Fluxus community, and along with his wife, Cathy Mehrle Bennett, is also an active participant in the international network of mail artists. Since 1974, Luna Bisonte Prods has published a wide variety of experimental, avant-garde, audio, and visual literature in a wide variety of formats by artists from all over the world. Among the authors and artists published are such major and emerging figures as Ivan Argüelles, Sheila E. Murphy, Jim Leftwich, Andrew Topel, Carlos M. Luis, Scott Helmes, Jake Berry, John M. Bennett, Susan Smith Nash, Al Ackerman, Bob Heman, Richard Kostelanetz, Charles Henri Ford, Dick Higgins, Robin Crozier, Peter Ganick, and many others. LBP books are collected in major libraries and institutions, including The Museum of Modern Art, The Sackner Archive, Princeton University, SUNY Buffalo, The University of Wisconsin, Brown University, New York Public Library, Washington University, Ohio University, The Ohio State University, and many others.

Make a MIDI controller/digital interface with a Teensy 3.6
November 09, 2019

About the workshop
In this workshop participants will be learning how to make a MIDI controller/digital interface. The skills participants will learn in this workshop can be utilized for creating a musical instrument, an interactive sculpture, or interactive wearable device among many other things. MIDI is a protocol language that is used in music, robotics, lighting and has many other applications.

We will be taking a Teensy 3.6 micro controller and programming it to act as a MIDI device that can be used with any music software or hardware that recognizes MIDI. We will learn about different kinds of sensors, including Force Sensing Resistors (FSRs), Potentiometers, button switches and toggle switches. We will learn how to create simple circuits on a breadboard that will enable us to get sensor data into our Teensy, and how to wire an LED to be controlled by our Teensy.

We will then learn how to get the data from the Teensy into a computer using interactive software called Pure Data. MIDI data from a Teensy can be used to control a synthesizer, play audio, control a lighting board, control a robot or any other device of software that is compatible with MIDI. Other topics we will cover are some basic principles of electronics, the purpose of some electrical components like resistors, and how to solder.

No previous knowledge is required to attend this workshop, but experience with electronics, soldering, or programming in Max or Pure Data software would be helpful.

Some videos highlighting this project:

About the Instructor
Nick Demopoulos is a performer, musician and instrument builder based in Los Angeles. In his performances as Smomid (which stands for String Modeling Midi Device), he only utilizes instruments he has designed and built to perform interactive computer music.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below (note: the price is per kit, not per person. More than one person can work on a kit at a time):

Make a MIDI controller with a Teensy 3.6
Registration for one kit
$95.00

Performance: Smomid (LAX) + Jacoti Sommes (CMH) + Cynders (CMH)
November 09, 2019

On the evening of Saturday, November 9th we are proud to present electronic musician and instrument builder Nick Demopoulos’ solo project Smomid, experimental electronic musician Jacoti Sommes (CMH), and experimental trip Cynders. Doors 7:30, BYOB, all ages. $5-$10.

About the artists:

Smomid is a project by Nick Demopoulos, who is a performer, musician and instrument builder. Smomid only utilizes instruments he has designed and built to perform interactive computer music. The name is derived from an acronym of his primary instrument: “String Modeling Midi Device.” Smomid music often features glitchy and scattered beats, sampling, abstract textures, ambient spaces, and improvisation. Smomid music draws on many varied influences and creates bizarre juxtapositions with deft sonic versatility, with samples of heavy beats, Gregorian Monks chanting and Taiko drum sounds all coexisting comfortably.

Jacoti Sommes is a prolific Ohioan multi-instrumentalist, composer and hardware maestro well known in his Native Columbus, Ohio for captivating performances with his performance art group Hug’s and Kisses. You may have witnessed his live performances in venues like Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus Museum of Art, or in a more intimate Brooklyn loft space improvising and crafting minimal techno rhythms.

Cynders (as in “burnt to”) is an instrumental 3 piece from Columbus, Ohio. This trio uses a combination of synthesizers, loopers, drum machines, bass guitar and effects pedals to extemporaneously improvise experimental soundscapes. Each performance is uniquely created in the moment. The music sounds like psychedelic meets modern electronica and industrial atmospherics meets Can.

The Science of Sound: Introduction to Pure Data part I
November 16, 2019

About the workshop
PureData (PD) is a free, open-source visual programming environment for musicians and artists, allowing them to build their own music or multimedia instruments without writing code. It is easy-to-learn yet powerful tool, very similar to (and sharing DNA with) the commercial program MAX, the industry standard for this kind of work. (Information about this software is available at https://puredata.info).

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Learn how to install and configure PD on their own laptops.
  • Learn the basics of visual programming, connecting functional objects (like oscillators, noise sources, filters, and amplifiers) together to create their own configurable software instruments (synthesizers).
  • Learn how to use PD to manipulate and play back sound files (eg., sampling), or to process live sound.
  • Create their own customizable sound instrument in PD.
  • Learn about the origins and history of PD, it’s relationship to other programs such as MAX, and how it continues to be developed and supported by its online user community.
  • Be introduced to additional resources to continue their exploration of PD, and to expand its capabilities to include multimedia such as visuals or video.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)
  • Using the iPad to make music

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the instructor
Bbob Drake has been creating experimental music and audio in Cleveland for the last 45 years. From a start as a guitarist, his current focus is on electro-acoustic improvisation in both solo and group settings. His solo work spans a range from “lowercase” or “onkyokei” aesthetics (quiet, minimalist, abstract), to free jazz and more aggressive noise genres. He designs and builds the majority of his own instruments, both electronic synthesizers and original electo-acoustic designs. bbob has lead workshops in experimental electronics for music at Spaces and other venues, and he designs and sells printed circuit boards for DIY synthesizer enthusiasts. bbob’s most recent recorded releases are “Failure Cake” (solo CD) and “Curiouser” (with Cleveland drummer J. Guy Laughlin)

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below (the workshop fee of $35 will enroll you in BOTH parts – no need to register for each part separately):

Introduction to PD Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: Introduction to Pure Data part II
November 23, 2019

About the workshop
PureData (PD) is a free, open-source visual programming environment for musicians and artists, allowing them to build their own music or multimedia instruments without writing code. It is easy-to-learn yet powerful tool, very similar to (and sharing DNA with) the commercial program MAX, the industry standard for this kind of work. (Information about this software is available at https://puredata.info).

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Learn how to install and configure PD on their own laptops.
  • Learn the basics of visual programming, connecting functional objects (like oscillators, noise sources, filters, and amplifiers) together to create their own configurable software instruments (synthesizers).
  • Learn how to use PD to manipulate and play back sound files (eg., sampling), or to process live sound.
  • Create their own customizable sound instrument in PD.
  • Learn about the origins and history of PD, it’s relationship to other programs such as MAX, and how it continues to be developed and supported by its online user community.
  • Be introduced to additional resources to continue their exploration of PD, and to expand its capabilities to include multimedia such as visuals or video.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)
  • Using the iPad to make music

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the instructor
Bbob Drake has been creating experimental music and audio in Cleveland for the last 45 years. From a start as a guitarist, his current focus is on electro-acoustic improvisation in both solo and group settings. His solo work spans a range from “lowercase” or “onkyokei” aesthetics (quiet, minimalist, abstract), to free jazz and more aggressive noise genres. He designs and builds the majority of his own instruments, both electronic synthesizers and original electo-acoustic designs. bbob has lead workshops in experimental electronics for music at Spaces and other venues, and he designs and sells printed circuit boards for DIY synthesizer enthusiasts. bbob’s most recent recorded releases are “Failure Cake” (solo CD) and “Curiouser” (with Cleveland drummer J. Guy Laughlin)

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below (the workshop fee of $35 will enroll you in BOTH parts – no need to register for each part separately):

Introduction to PD Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: An Intro to Sampling and Field Recording
December 04, 2019

About the workshop
The music/soundscapes recorded in this workshop center on creating artifacts of our existence and not centered on the idea of music production for making money, art, expression, or even communication. Of course, these external factors may come into play, however, the focus is simply saying, “I was here – I’m human – this is what happened – this is my response to what I recorded, and this is what I did with it”. The workshop will discuss field recording practices as well as sampling and manipulation of an audio signal.

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Learn about various tools that can be used to manipulate sound (software-based music production tools)
  • Explore the idea that music is a human behavior and is hardwired into our human experience and existence.
  • Become familiar with the music gear used in the field recording session and will explore music production considerations. These considerations include creating a song from field sampling and improvisation.
  • Record and sample sounds in their environment using portable recording gear such as a mobile phone.
  • Using software and hardware based samplers to manipulate captured sounds.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Using the iPad to make music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the Instructors
Kevin Cardoso is an analog hacker at heart and this nature has driven him to explore a variety of art forms that include wood, metal, paper, clay, music, and electronics. As a creative arts therapist, he has experience teaching people of various age groups and abilities. He feels that patience and flexibility is an important approach to help people loosen up, learn, engage with the process, and find satisfaction with their work.

Ben Turner is a musician and songwriter, and these interests have driven him to embrace the manipulation of sound in the home recording studio. He is a music therapist, with a background in various age groups and populations. He attended the College of Wooster and the Cleveland Music Therapy Consortium. He believes that improvisation and audio recording are great platforms for embracing innate musicality, and integrating the head and the heart.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Intro to Sampling and Field Recording
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: Community-based sound collaboration: Creating and defining the artifact
December 11, 2019

About the workshop
This workshop encourages critical thinking from participants and open opportunities to learn from one another – all while engaging in the process of playing music and recording. (The workshop is open to all – no previous experience with a musical instrument or music production is required.)

Explore the concept of Musical Artifacts – recording sound for the purpose of journaling, excavating, restructuring, creating and destroying. When we record something we are documenting a moment – or the process of the moment. The workshop instructors will provide live and digital instruments, along with loopers, effects pedals, and basic music production gear; participants may bring their own instruments, but this is optional.

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Receive an introduced to sampling and recording techniques through community-based improvisation and audio journaling.
  • Work together and support one another in creating a community-based recording.
  • Come away with a recording of a complete song built from the manipulated sounds generated during the improvisation session

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Using the iPad to make music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the Instructors
Kevin Cardoso is an analog hacker at heart and this nature has driven him to explore a variety of art forms that include wood, metal, paper, clay, music, and electronics. As a creative arts therapist, he has experience teaching people of various age groups and abilities. He feels that patience and flexibility is an important approach to help people loosen up, learn, engage with the process, and find satisfaction with their work.

Ben Turner is a musician and songwriter, and these interests have driven him to embrace the manipulation of sound in the home recording studio. He is a music therapist, with a background in various age groups and populations. He attended the College of Wooster and the Cleveland Music Therapy Consortium. He believes that improvisation and audio recording are great platforms for embracing innate musicality, and integrating the head and the heart.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Creating and defining the artifact
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: Getting familiar with gear: Hardware and software
December 14, 2019

About the workshop
There are many things to consider when deciding what to use to record and manipulate sound. Selecting recording software and the hardware is often an experiment within itself and basic gear knowledge can eliminate some of the guesswork involved. In this workshop, participants will be introduced to Cakewalk, a music production software package suitable for novices (software information available at https://www.bandlab.com/products/cakewalk/).

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Learn about various software tools that can be used to manipulate sound, with an emphasis on the music production software Cakewalk
  • Learn about the basics of music production hardware; details will be covered in a handout.
  • Understand how to connect gear, which includes dos and don’ts. The process of audio setup will be demystified.
  • Learn how to set up audio tracks and record.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Using the iPad to make music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the Instructors
Kevin Cardoso is an analog hacker at heart and this nature has driven him to explore a variety of art forms that include wood, metal, paper, clay, music, and electronics. As a creative arts therapist, he has experience teaching people of various age groups and abilities. He feels that patience and flexibility is an important approach to help people loosen up, learn, engage with the process, and find satisfaction with their work.

Ben Turner is a musician and songwriter, and these interests have driven him to embrace the manipulation of sound in the home recording studio. He is a music therapist, with a background in various age groups and populations. He attended the College of Wooster and the Cleveland Music Therapy Consortium. He believes that improvisation and audio recording are great platforms for embracing innate musicality, and integrating the head and the heart.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Getting familiar with gear
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: Introduction to granular synthesis
January 18, 2020

About the workshop
Granular synthesis, based on the same principle as sampling, is a basic sound synthesis method that operates on the microsound time scale. The samples in granular synthesis are segmented into small pieces, called grains, that can be layered on top of one another and can be played at different speeds, phases, volume, and frequency. Greek composer Iannis Xenakis is known as the inventor of the granular synthesis technique and was the first to explicate a compositional theory for grains of sound. Canadian composer Barry Truax was one of the first to implement real-time versions of this synthesis technique.

In this workshop, participants will explore the fundamental concepts of granular synthesis through the use of various software, theory, historical background, and seminal recordings. We will explore both synthesis of granular sound as well as granular processing techniques. Participants will use the audio programming language ‘MAX/MSP’ to build custom granular software and will also explore a host of popular free plug-ins usable in any DAW on any operating system.

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the Instructor
Owen Hopper is a Cincinnati Ohio based composer, sound artist, guitarist, computer programmer, and improviser. His music explores the relationships between the space it is recorded and presented in. He is currently an Adjunct Instructor at the University of Cincinnati.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Intro to granular synthesis
Registration for one
$35.00
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