The Science of Sound: Community-based sound collaboration: Creating and defining the artifact
December 14, 2019

About the workshop
This workshop encourages critical thinking from participants and open opportunities to learn from one another – all while engaging in the process of playing music and recording. (The workshop is open to all – no previous experience with a musical instrument or music production is required.)

Explore the concept of Musical Artifacts – recording sound for the purpose of journaling, excavating, restructuring, creating and destroying. When we record something we are documenting a moment – or the process of the moment. The workshop instructors will provide live and digital instruments, along with loopers, effects pedals, and basic music production gear; participants may bring their own instruments, but this is optional.

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Receive an introduced to sampling and recording techniques through community-based improvisation and audio journaling.
  • Work together and support one another in creating a community-based recording.
  • Come away with a recording of a complete song built from the manipulated sounds generated during the improvisation session

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Using the iPad to make music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the Instructors
Kevin Cardoso is an analog hacker at heart and this nature has driven him to explore a variety of art forms that include wood, metal, paper, clay, music, and electronics. As a creative arts therapist, he has experience teaching people of various age groups and abilities. He feels that patience and flexibility is an important approach to help people loosen up, learn, engage with the process, and find satisfaction with their work.

Ben Turner is a musician and songwriter, and these interests have driven him to embrace the manipulation of sound in the home recording studio. He is a music therapist, with a background in various age groups and populations. He attended the College of Wooster and the Cleveland Music Therapy Consortium. He believes that improvisation and audio recording are great platforms for embracing innate musicality, and integrating the head and the heart.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Creating and defining the artifact
Registration for one
$35.00

Performance: uncertain (NY) + Envenomist (CMH) + VERSIONING (CMH)
December 28, 2019

On the evening of Saturday, December 28th we are proud to present Florian-Ayala Fauna’s dark ambient project uncertain (NY), David Reed’s (CMH) solo dark ambient project Envenomist, and Danielle Milam’s (CMH) solo experimental electronic project VERSIONING. Doors 7:30, BYOB, all ages. $5-$10.

About the artists:

uncertain is an occult post-industrial project started in 2007 by Florian-Ayala Fauna, combining elements of æthyrl composition and ambience, dark strange sounds and noise, and elements of religious/ritual musick. The project consists of a very large discography, ranging from Coil-influenced traditional song structures, ritual ambient, electronic music, and disturbing visceral noise. Live performances are of an esoteric nature, consisting much in the way of a visual presence with animal masks and ritual attire, video projections, and ritual-like set-up. Music during these shows are of a more vicious and visceral nature, playing more aggressive tracks with screaming, shrill, and shouted vocals, heavy thunderous drums, and noise with animal screams. She is often accompanied live by her partner Felix Keigh, who provides vocals fed through numerous effects as well as on studio releases with more traditionally sung lyrics.

Some people equate Envenomist with science fiction film scores and others envision solitary nocturnal travels through bleak urban settings, but a fundamental strength of Envenomist is that these illusory backdrops remain open to interpretation.

VERSIONING is Danielle Milam, previously known as Sea Tone. VERSIONING can be described as experimental electronic that flirts between ambient and noise soundscapes.

The Science of Sound: Introduction to granular synthesis
January 18, 2020

About the workshop
Granular synthesis, based on the same principle as sampling, is a basic sound synthesis method that operates on the microsound time scale. The samples in granular synthesis are segmented into small pieces, called grains, that can be layered on top of one another and can be played at different speeds, phases, volume, and frequency. Greek composer Iannis Xenakis is known as the inventor of the granular synthesis technique and was the first to explicate a compositional theory for grains of sound. Canadian composer Barry Truax was one of the first to implement real-time versions of this synthesis technique.

In this workshop, participants will explore the fundamental concepts of granular synthesis through the use of various software, theory, historical background, and seminal recordings. We will explore both synthesis of granular sound as well as granular processing techniques. Participants will use the audio programming language ‘MAX/MSP’ to build custom granular software and will also explore a host of popular free plug-ins usable in any DAW on any operating system.

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the Instructor
Owen Hopper is a Cincinnati Ohio based composer, sound artist, guitarist, computer programmer, and improviser. His music explores the relationships between the space it is recorded and presented in. He is currently an Adjunct Instructor at the University of Cincinnati.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Intro to granular synthesis
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi (Part I)
January 25, 2020

About the workshop
About the workshop: this two-session workshop explores the creation and performance of computer-generated music utilizing the free music programming language, Sonic Pi. The workshop provides a very gentle introduction to both computer programming and digital music production. Sonic Pi is fun and easy to learn. Consequently, it is a great first step for anyone interested in computer-generated music. The workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Basic computer programming with Sonic Pi
  • Samples
  • Software Synthesizers
  • Audio Effects
  • Randomization
  • Algorithmic composition and improvisation using live coding

Required
Workshop attendees should bring a laptop with Sonic Pi installed. Sonic Pi is available free for Windows, Mac and Linux systems at http://sonic-pi.net. The workshop will not assume any specific knowledge of computer programming or music theory. The workshop is appropriate for adults as well as younger learners (middle school and up). NOTE: The second session of the workshop will be held on Saturday, October 12 from 1-4pm.

About Sonic Pi
Sonic Pi is an open source music programming language designed specifically for live coding and other algorithmic music performances. It provides an elegant and easy-to-use environment for writing computer code that manipulates sounds generated from a library of samples and a large set of built-in synthesizers. Sonic Pi was developed by Sam Aaron at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. It is available free for the Windows, Mac OS X and Linux operating systems. It is part of the standard Raspberry Pi software distribution.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)
  • Using the iPad to make music

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the instructor
Michael Perkins is a technologist, musician and philosopher with special interests in discrete mathematics, data science, and algorithmic music and art. He is a graduate of Georgia State University where he studied music and philosophy and The Ohio State University where he studied philosophy and computer science. He completed a Ph.D. in Philosophy at The Ohio State University in 1983. For 35 years, Michael has developed advanced software systems for some of the world’s leading software vendors. He has designed and implemented special-purpose programming languages, data management tools, application generators, cross-platform networking software, and IT systems management software.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi (Part II)
February 01, 2020

About the workshop
About the workshop: this two-session workshop explores the creation and performance of computer-generated music utilizing the free music programming language, Sonic Pi. The workshop provides a very gentle introduction to both computer programming and digital music production. Sonic Pi is fun and easy to learn. Consequently, it is a great first step for anyone interested in computer-generated music. The workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Basic computer programming with Sonic Pi
  • Samples
  • Software Synthesizers
  • Audio Effects
  • Randomization
  • Algorithmic composition and improvisation using live coding

Required
Workshop attendees should bring a laptop with Sonic Pi installed. Sonic Pi is available free for Windows, Mac and Linux systems at http://sonic-pi.net. The workshop will not assume any specific knowledge of computer programming or music theory. The workshop is appropriate for adults as well as younger learners (middle school and up). NOTE: The first session of the workshop will be held on Saturday, January 21 from 1-3pm.

About Sonic Pi
Sonic Pi is an open source music programming language designed specifically for live coding and other algorithmic music performances. It provides an elegant and easy-to-use environment for writing computer code that manipulates sounds generated from a library of samples and a large set of built-in synthesizers. Sonic Pi was developed by Sam Aaron at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. It is available free for the Windows, Mac OS X and Linux operating systems. It is part of the standard Raspberry Pi software distribution.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)
  • Using the iPad to make music

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the instructor
Michael Perkins is a technologist, musician and philosopher with special interests in discrete mathematics, data science, and algorithmic music and art. He is a graduate of Georgia State University where he studied music and philosophy and The Ohio State University where he studied philosophy and computer science. He completed a Ph.D. in Philosophy at The Ohio State University in 1983. For 35 years, Michael has developed advanced software systems for some of the world’s leading software vendors. He has designed and implemented special-purpose programming languages, data management tools, application generators, cross-platform networking software, and IT systems management software.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

First Ever Ohio Record Label Convention
April 18, 2020

On Saturday, April 18th, we are excited to present our debut record label convention featuring Ohio-based independent labels specializing in all guises of experimental, electronic, and underground music. Record label vendors will make available all manner of CD’s, cassette tapes, vinyl, and an assortment of music merchandise.

The convention will take place from noon-4pm at the It Looks Like Its Open gallery (13 E. Tulane Rd). and Open Heart Art (17 E. Tulane Rd.). Admission is $5.

If you are an independent record label based in Ohio and you would like to participate, we would love to work with you! To reserve one or more spots, please register using the link below. The fee is $10 per spot (one spot = one 6- or 8-foot table; we strongly suggest that vendors bring their own tables, since we have a very limited number of tables available).

Questions or concerns? Please don’t hesitate to contact Fuse Factory ED Alison Colman at: alison@thefusefactory.org.

Vendor registration fees
To reserve one or more spots in the convention, please register using the links below:

Ohio record label convention vendor registration
Registration for one spot
$10.00
Ohio record label convention vendor registration
Registration for two spots
$20.00
Ohio record label convention vendor registration
Registration for three spots
$30.00