Workshop: Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi (Part I)
January 21, 2017

About the workshop
About the workshop: this two-session workshop explores the creation and performance of computer-generated music utilizing the free music programming language, Sonic Pi. The workshop provides a very gentle introduction to both computer programming and digital music production. Sonic Pi is fun and easy to learn. Consequently, it is a great first step for anyone interested in computer-generated music. The workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Basic computer programming with Sonic Pi
  • Samples
  • Software Synthesizers
  • Audio Effects
  • Randomization
  • Algorithmic composition and improvisation using live coding

Required
Workshop attendees should bring a laptop with Sonic Pi installed. Sonic Pi is available free for Windows, Mac and Linux systems at http://sonic-pi.net. The workshop will not assume any specific knowledge of computer programming or music theory. The workshop is appropriate for adults as well as younger learners (middle school and up). NOTE: The second session of the workshop will be held on Saturday, January 28 from 1-3pm.

About Sonic Pi
Sonic Pi is an open source music programming language designed specifically for live coding and other algorithmic music performances. It provides an elegant and easy-to-use environment for writing computer code that manipulates sounds generated from a library of samples and a large set of built-in synthesizers. Sonic Pi was developed by Sam Aaron at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. It is available free for the Windows, Mac OS X and Linux operating systems. It is part of the standard Raspberry Pi software distribution.

About the instructor
Michael Perkins is a technologist, musician and philosopher with special interests in Buddhist philosophy, discrete mathematics, data science, contemporary jazz, and algorithmic music. He is a graduate of Georgia State University where he studied music and philosophy and The Ohio State University where he studied philosophy and computer science. He completed a Ph.D. in Philosophy at The Ohio State University in 1983. For 35 years, Michael has developed advanced software systems for some of the world’s leading software vendors. He has designed and implemented special-purpose programming languages, data management tools, application generators, cross-platform networking software, and IT systems management software. Currently, Michael is Chief Scientist for Prosper Technologies, where he designs and implements software systems for integrating, analyzing and visualizing complex sets of data.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

Workshop: Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi (Part II)
January 28, 2017

About the workshop
About the workshop: this two-session workshop explores the creation and performance of computer-generated music utilizing the free music programming language, Sonic Pi. The workshop provides a very gentle introduction to both computer programming and digital music production. Sonic Pi is fun and easy to learn. Consequently, it is a great first step for anyone interested in computer-generated music. The workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Basic computer programming with Sonic Pi
  • Samples
  • Software Synthesizers
  • Audio Effects
  • Randomization
  • Algorithmic composition and improvisation using live coding

Required
Workshop attendees should bring a laptop with Sonic Pi installed. Sonic Pi is available free for Windows, Mac and Linux systems at http://sonic-pi.net. The workshop will not assume any specific knowledge of computer programming or music theory. The workshop is appropriate for adults as well as younger learners (middle school and up). NOTE: The first session of the workshop will be held on Saturday, January 21 from 1-3pm.

About Sonic Pi
Sonic Pi is an open source music programming language designed specifically for live coding and other algorithmic music performances. It provides an elegant and easy-to-use environment for writing computer code that manipulates sounds generated from a library of samples and a large set of built-in synthesizers. Sonic Pi was developed by Sam Aaron at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. It is available free for the Windows, Mac OS X and Linux operating systems. It is part of the standard Raspberry Pi software distribution.

About the instructor
Michael Perkins is a technologist, musician and philosopher with special interests in Buddhist philosophy, discrete mathematics, data science, contemporary jazz, and algorithmic music. He is a graduate of Georgia State University where he studied music and philosophy and The Ohio State University where he studied philosophy and computer science. He completed a Ph.D. in Philosophy at The Ohio State University in 1983. For 35 years, Michael has developed advanced software systems for some of the world’s leading software vendors. He has designed and implemented special-purpose programming languages, data management tools, application generators, cross-platform networking software, and IT systems management software. Currently, Michael is Chief Scientist for Prosper Technologies, where he designs and implements software systems for integrating, analyzing and visualizing complex sets of data.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

February 2017 Frequency Fridays: Ivy Meadows (NYC) + Fluxmonkey (CLE) + Field Sleeper (CMH) + HolyKindOf (OH)
February 03, 2017

Our February 2017 Frequency Fridays show features Ivy Meadows, the solo project of experimental musician/video artist Camilla Padgitt-Coles (NYC), Fluxmonkey, the solo project of experimental electronic musician Bbob Drake (CLE), Alexander Paquet’s experimental/electronic music solo project Field Sleeper (CMH), and multi-instrumentalist J Bryan Parks’ solo project HolyKindOf (OH). Date: Friday, February 3 2017. Location: It Looks Like It’s Open (13 E. Tulane Rd., 43202). Admission: $10, $15 for 2. Doors open 8pm. BYOB, all ages. Our Frequency Fridays 2016-2017 season is supported by a grant from the Greater Columbus Arts Council.

About the performers:

Camilla Padgitt-Coles (b. 1985, New York City) is a multimedia artist working in light, sound, video and audio-visual environments. In 2007 she received a B.A. in Studio Art from Oberlin College for drawing, painting and printmaking. Since 2009 she has performed live music and projections. She plays and records solo as Ivy Meadows and in ambient projects Future Shuttle, Energy Star, Tropical Rock and Non Human Persons (Past: Deep Space/KA, Guardian Alien.) In 2011 she founded Perfect Wave, a collectively curated online & print publishing platform and record label which “maintains a committed vision to experimental performance, sound and art with a special interest in creating intergenerational dialogue.” Perfect Wave produces a magazine, releases music and organizes events in NYC.

bbob drake has been creating experimental music and audio in Cleveland for the last 45 years. From a start as a guitarist, his current focus is on electro-acoustic improvisation in both solo and group settings. His solo work spans a range from “lowercase” or “onkyokei” aesthetics (quiet, minimalist, abstract), to free jazz and more aggressive noise genres. He designs and builds the majority of his own instruments, both electronic synthesizers and original electo-acoustic designs. bbob has lead workshops in experimental electronics for music at Spaces and other venues, and he designs and sells printed circuit boards for DIY synthesizer enthusiasts. bbob’s most recent recorded releases are “Failure Cake” (solo CD) and “Curiouser” (with Cleveland drummer J. Guy Laughlin)

HolyKindOf is multi instrumentalist J. Bryan Parks from Akron, Ohio, who began this solo venture in the late spring of 2012 as a cathartic response to personal tragedy. He uses dense layers of manipulated loops from sounds sourced primarily from cello, field recordings, tape, and voice. He sculpts his music viscerally; it can be described as a requiem of repetitive phrases, culminating in a swirl of heady delicacies, evolving melodies and crescendos. Each live performance is unique and composed specifically for each space. The composition of his live performances are open ended, improvised constructions; they can be likened to a quilt of sound pieces stitched together.