Build a Light Sensing Robot
November 11, 2017 - November 25, 2017

About the workshop
Come make an inexpensive, fully autonomous, light sensing, Arduino-based, driving robot! NOTE: This workshop will take place over the course of three 3-hour sessions: November 11, 18, and 25 from 10am to 1pm.

In this hands-on workshop, you will design and build an autonomous robot. We will be using the famous Arduino microcontroller as the brain for our robot, and simple materials like cardboard to construct the frame and wheels. All materials will be provided, but you may want to download the Arduino IDE (the software for development) and bring your laptop so you can program the robot yourself.

By the end of this workshop, students should be able to:

  • Program an Arduino microcontroller.
  • Create an electrical circuit using a breadboard and jumper wires.
  • Construct a simple robot frame and wheels.
  • Correctly solder a wire to a terminal.
  • Debug their system!

Cost for this workshop covers a materials kit that includes the following gear for you to take home:

  • An Arduino R3
  • A small breadboard
  • A motor driver board
  • A set of 30 jumper wires
  • Three photoresistors
  • Two small gear motors
  • A small caster wheel

This workshop is most suitable for adults and youth aged 13 and above. Children under the age of 13 are welcome, but it is strongly suggested that they be accompanied by an adult. No previous experience with electronics, microcontrollers, or robotics is assumed.

About the Instructor
Andrew Frueh is a hacker, open-source evangelist, and critical maker. He designs systems with Arduino, is very involved with fabrication (including designing a modular robotic platform, and building a couple of 3D printers), and received his MFA from the Art and Tech program in the Department of Art at the Ohio State University. He is a lecturer and lab supervisor for the Ohio State University Department of Art. Website: http://www.andrewfrueh.com

Workshop fees
The price of the workshop is per robotics kit, not per person. To reserve one or more seats in the workshop, please register using one of the links below:

Build a Light Sensing Robot - student/family price
Registration for one kit
$75.00
Build a Light Sensing Robot - regular price
Registration for one kit
$125.00

December 2017 Frequency Fridays: Monica Panzarino (NYC) + Troy Rogers (MN) + Will Soderberg (IL) + galen tipton (CMH)
December 01, 2017

Our December 2017 Frequency Fridays show features video artist Monica Panzarino (NYC), composer/semi-nomadic robot herder Troy Rogers (MN), experimental electronic musician Will Soderberg (IL), and experimental electronic musician galen tipton (CMH). Date: Friday, December 1 2017. Location: It Looks Like It’s Open (13 E. Tulane Rd., 43202). Admission: $10, $15 for 2. Doors open 8pm. BYOB, all ages. Our Frequency Fridays 2017-2018 season is supported by grants from the Greater Columbus Arts Council, the Ohio Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

About the performers:

Monica Panzarino (b. 1979, New York, NY) is a video artist and educator. Her single-channel, performance, and installation works combine real-time image/sound manipulations with a feminist, and often humorous, critique of American popular culture. Panzarino received a Master of Fine Art from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2011, and a Bachelor of Fine Art from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 2002. Her work has exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Cheekwood Botanical Garden & Museum of Art in Nashville, TN, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, MA, the European Media Art Festival in Osnabrück, Germany, WRO Media Art Biennale in Wroclaw, Poland, the Chicago Underground Film Festival, Art in General in New York, NY, and Aggregate Space Gallery in Oakland, CA, among other venues. She was an artist-in-residence at Signal Culture in Owego, NY in 2016 and 2015, and at the Experimental Television Center in Owego, NY in 2008, 2007, and 2003. Panzarino currently lives in Queens, NY. She teaches in the Film/Video Department at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY.

For over 13 years, composer Troy Rogers‘ creative work has focused on the development and exploration of robotic musical instruments as generators of new musical possibilities. As a musical robot maker, he co-founded Expressive Machines Musical Instruments (EMMI), a group of composers dedicated to exploring and expanding the potential of robotic musical instruments. As a Fulbright scholar, he spent time at the Logos Foundation in Ghent, Belgium working with Godfried-Willem Raes and what is perhaps the world’s largest robot orchestra, where he developed a singing vocal robot, Stemmetje. Living the life of an early 21st century semi-nomadic robot herder, he resides in Duluth, MN when not touring the country in the RoboRig, a mobile platform for the development and dissemination of music for robots. He performs on streets and stages alike as Robot Rickshaw. Rogers is also a committed independent educator, regularly presenting lectures and offering Making Music with Robots and STEAM education workshops at universities, galleries, community art centers, makerspaces, and schools throughout the US.

galen tipton is a queer nonbinary artist currently based out of Columbus, Ohio. Their work explores relationships between the assumed-to-be “natural” and the “unnatural,” queerness and identity, ethical utopias and eco futurism, the repurposing of waste and excess, as well as the nuances of intimacy between things living and not living. Their work is often childish and triumphant, embracing minimalism and maximalism simultaneously— always with a strong sense of play.

Will Soderberg is an interdisciplinary artist working in sound, video, installations, and performance who is active in community media and as an educator. He is a Michigan native, now residing in suburban Chicago. Recent artist residencies include Ragdale (Lake Forest, IL), Signal Culture (Owego, NY) and Entropy Stereo (Redford, MI). Recent works include music for the award-winning animated short film “Lingua Absentia” (2016, by Kate Raney & Jeremy Bessoff), and composed and performed live electronic music for EnidSmithDance groups’s “Interstice” (February 2016). Soderberg’s recordings are available at whiterosenetwork.bandcamp.com

Workshop: Making Music with Robots - Build Your Own Drumming Robot!
December 02, 2017

drumming_robot

About the workshop
In this workshop, students will be introduced to the field of musical robotics by composer and instrument builder Troy Rogers, who has been making music with robots himself for the past 13 years. After receiving a short demo and opportunity to interact with the instructor’s own robotic instrument ensemble, students will construct their own robotic drummer: a small tabletop device with two independent striking arms, controlled by an Arduino microcontroller. A limited number of kits will be available for purchase (first come, first served). The kit is open source and expandable, and can be subsequently made into a mobile drumming robot that can be programmed to sense and interact with its environment. This workshop requires no previous experience with electronics, programming, or microcontrollers, and serves as a great basic introduction to robotics, coding, the Arduino environment, and computer music. Students are encouraged to bring their own found percussion instruments (drums, pots, pans, canisters, boxes, or anything else that can make an interesting sound when struck).

Required
No previous experience with electronic music or electronics is required. All needed parts and equipment are included in the price of the workshop and will be provided to participants. This workshop will move at a pace appropriate for adult learners, but children with a strong interest in electronic music or electronics may attend if at least eight years old and accompanied by a parent or guardian.

About the instructor
For over 13 years, composer Troy Rogers‘ creative work has focused on the development and exploration of robotic musical instruments as generators of new musical possibilities. As a musical robot maker, he co-founded Expressive Machines Musical Instruments (EMMI), a group of composers dedicated to exploring and expanding the potential of robotic musical instruments. As a Fulbright scholar, he spent time at the Logos Foundation in Ghent, Belgium working with Godfried-Willem Raes and what is perhaps the world’s largest robot orchestra, where he developed a singing vocal robot, Stemmetje. Living the life of an early 21st century semi-nomadic robot herder, he resides in Duluth, MN when not touring the country in the RoboRig, a mobile platform for the development and dissemination of music for robots. He performs on streets and stages alike as Robot Rickshaw. Rogers is also a committed independent educator, regularly presenting lectures and offering Making Music with Robots and STEAM education workshops at universities, galleries, community art centers, makerspaces, and schools throughout the US.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the one of the links below – the price is *per kit*, not per person. The workshop will come with instructions for building the kit if one wishes to purchase one from Troy at a later date:

Build Your Own Drumming Robot - we keep the kit/robot
Registration for one individual or family
$25.00
Build Your Own Drumming Robot - you keep the kit/robot
Registration for one individual or family
$95.00

An Intro to Sampling and Recording through Community-based Improvisation
December 07, 2017

About the workshop
In this workshop, participants will be introduced to sampling and recording techniques through community based improvisation and audio journaling. The workshop instructors will provide live and digital instruments, along with loopers, effects pedals, and basic music production gear; participants may bring their own instruments, but this is optional. Participants will come away with a recording of a complete song built from the manipulated sounds generated during the improvisation session.

More specifically, workshop participants will:

  • Explore the idea that music is a human behavior and is hardwired into our human experience and existence.
  • Become familiar with music gear and music production considerations that include creating a structure from sampling improvisation in order to build a song.
  • Learn about various tools that can be used to manipulate sound.
  • Work together and support one another in creating a community based recording.

The workshop is open to all – no previous experience with a musical instrument or music production is required.

About the Instructors
Kevin Cardoso is an analog hacker at heart and this nature has driven him to explore a variety of art forms that include wood, metal, paper, clay, music, and electronics. As a creative arts therapist, he has experience teaching people of various age groups and abilities. He feels that patience and flexibility is an important approach to help people loosen up, learn, engage with the process, and find satisfaction with their work.

Ben Turner is a musician and songwriter, and these interests have driven him to embrace the manipulation of sound in the home recording studio. He is a music therapist, with a background in various age groups and populations. He attended the College of Wooster and the Cleveland Music Therapy Consortium. He believes that improvisation and audio recording are great platforms for embracing innate musicality, and integrating the head and the heart.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Intro to Sampling and Recording
Registration for one
$35.00

Make a Mini Glowie Monster
December 16, 2017

In this fun, hands-on workshop participants make a small felt monster with LED eyes that light up when you squeeze its tummy. In this workshop, participants will Learn some basic electronics and soft circuits concepts. No previous experience with electronics or sewing is required. This workshop is fun for all ages and suitable for children aged 6 and up, although younger children are welcome if they are accompanied by a parent. This is a great DIY gift or stocking stuffer!

About the Instructor
Dr. Alison Colman’s first venture into new media and digital art was as an undergraduate at Carnegie Mellon University. She continued on this path as a freelance computer animator and graduate student at The Ohio State University, where she received her MA and Ph.D. Most of her coursework was through the Advanced Computing Center for Art and Design at The Ohio State University, where she developed a strong interest in 3D animation, digital art, cyberculture studies, art criticism, and education. She has published scholarly articles on digital art and theory in journals such as Visual Arts Research, Studies in Art Education, and the Journal of Social Theory in Art Education, written artist reviews for the Tate Gallery Online and Furtherfield.com, and has lectured on digital art and art criticism nationally and internationally. Her work has also been screened at Siggraph, the Parsons School of Art and Design, and the Big Muddy Film Festival.

After teaching in the School of Art at Ohio University, Athens from 2002-2007, Dr. Colman founded the Fuse Factory Electronic and Digital Arts, where she has served as its founding director up to the present. Under her direction, the Fuse Factory has served hundreds of new media and sound artists and experimental electronic musicians from around the U.S. and Ohio, along with thousands of people around central Ohio, through its performances, exhibitions, and workshops.

Workshop fees
The price of the workshop is per glowie monster kit, not per person. To reserve one or more seats in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Make a Mini Glowie Monster
Registration for one kit
$15.00