The Science of Sound: Introduction to Pure Data part II
November 23, 2019

About the workshop
PureData (PD) is a free, open-source visual programming environment for musicians and artists, allowing them to build their own music or multimedia instruments without writing code. It is easy-to-learn yet powerful tool, very similar to (and sharing DNA with) the commercial program MAX, the industry standard for this kind of work. (Information about this software is available at https://puredata.info).

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Learn how to install and configure PD on their own laptops.
  • Learn the basics of visual programming, connecting functional objects (like oscillators, noise sources, filters, and amplifiers) together to create their own configurable software instruments (synthesizers).
  • Learn how to use PD to manipulate and play back sound files (eg., sampling), or to process live sound.
  • Create their own customizable sound instrument in PD.
  • Learn about the origins and history of PD, it’s relationship to other programs such as MAX, and how it continues to be developed and supported by its online user community.
  • Be introduced to additional resources to continue their exploration of PD, and to expand its capabilities to include multimedia such as visuals or video.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)
  • Using the iPad to make music

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the instructor
Bbob Drake has been creating experimental music and audio in Cleveland for the last 45 years. From a start as a guitarist, his current focus is on electro-acoustic improvisation in both solo and group settings. His solo work spans a range from “lowercase” or “onkyokei” aesthetics (quiet, minimalist, abstract), to free jazz and more aggressive noise genres. He designs and builds the majority of his own instruments, both electronic synthesizers and original electo-acoustic designs. bbob has lead workshops in experimental electronics for music at Spaces and other venues, and he designs and sells printed circuit boards for DIY synthesizer enthusiasts. bbob’s most recent recorded releases are “Failure Cake” (solo CD) and “Curiouser” (with Cleveland drummer J. Guy Laughlin)

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below (the workshop fee of $35 will enroll you in BOTH parts – no need to register for each part separately):

Introduction to PD Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: An Intro to Sampling and Field Recording
December 04, 2019

About the workshop
The music/soundscapes recorded in this workshop center on creating artifacts of our existence and not centered on the idea of music production for making money, art, expression, or even communication. Of course, these external factors may come into play, however, the focus is simply saying, “I was here – I’m human – this is what happened – this is my response to what I recorded, and this is what I did with it”. The workshop will discuss field recording practices as well as sampling and manipulation of an audio signal.

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Learn about various tools that can be used to manipulate sound (software-based music production tools)
  • Explore the idea that music is a human behavior and is hardwired into our human experience and existence.
  • Become familiar with the music gear used in the field recording session and will explore music production considerations. These considerations include creating a song from field sampling and improvisation.
  • Record and sample sounds in their environment using portable recording gear such as a mobile phone.
  • Using software and hardware based samplers to manipulate captured sounds.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Using the iPad to make music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the Instructors
Kevin Cardoso is an analog hacker at heart and this nature has driven him to explore a variety of art forms that include wood, metal, paper, clay, music, and electronics. As a creative arts therapist, he has experience teaching people of various age groups and abilities. He feels that patience and flexibility is an important approach to help people loosen up, learn, engage with the process, and find satisfaction with their work.

Ben Turner is a musician and songwriter, and these interests have driven him to embrace the manipulation of sound in the home recording studio. He is a music therapist, with a background in various age groups and populations. He attended the College of Wooster and the Cleveland Music Therapy Consortium. He believes that improvisation and audio recording are great platforms for embracing innate musicality, and integrating the head and the heart.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Intro to Sampling and Field Recording
Registration for one
$35.00

December 2019 Frequency Fridays: Andrea Pensado (BOS) + Max Eilbacher and Duncan Moore (BALT) + Fritz Pape (CINCY) + Reon Moebius/Turner Matthews (CMH)
December 06, 2019

Our December 2019 Frequency Fridays show features sound artist Andrea Pensado, conceptual electronic music duo Max Eilbacher and Duncan Moore, sound artist Fritz Pape, and the experimental electronic music duo of Turner Matthews and Reon Moebius. Date: Friday, December 6 2019. Location: 13 E. Tulane Rd. 43202. Admission: $10 for one, $15 for two. Doors open 7:30pm. All ages, BYOB. Our Frequency Fridays 2019-2020 season is supported by grants from the Greater Columbus Arts Council, the Ohio Arts Council, and the Columbus Foundation.

About the artists:

Based in the US since 2002, Pensado uses voice and electronics to make music. Max is her main tool. The programming emphasizes the mapping of synthesis parameters into performance gestures. The approach to both, programming and performance is highly intuitive. The harsh cut up noise result, mixed with the strong emotional component of her music, generates a deeply personal sonic language which inevitably gives rise to intense responses in the most diverse audiences. Pensado performs extensively in the US and abroad. She also produces Sonorium, a series of experimental music based in Salem, MA.

Max Eilbacher is an intermedia artist who works primarily with sound, video, and performance. His sound practice draws upon traditions of electroacoustic, musique concréte composition and process intensive computer music. Duncan Moore is a performance artist, percussionist, professional bagpiper, member of tribal haus group Home in Waverly, and a recent upstart in the christian noise scene.

Fritz Pape (aka Zijnzijn Zijnzijn!) explores the process of auditory growth and decay from whispered drones through digital corruption, utilizing a swath of guitar pedals, synthesizers and other sound-making devices. A deep dive through tiny crevasses of sound, stretched into gentle infinity.

Turner Matthews is a multi-instrumental/electronic musician, instrument creator, and composer. Reon Moebius is a Columbus-based experimental musician/multi-instrumentalist and runs Argali Records Netlabel.

The Science of Sound: Community-based sound collaboration: Creating and defining the artifact
December 11, 2019

About the workshop
This workshop encourages critical thinking from participants and open opportunities to learn from one another – all while engaging in the process of playing music and recording. (The workshop is open to all – no previous experience with a musical instrument or music production is required.)

Explore the concept of Musical Artifacts – recording sound for the purpose of journaling, excavating, restructuring, creating and destroying. When we record something we are documenting a moment – or the process of the moment. The workshop instructors will provide live and digital instruments, along with loopers, effects pedals, and basic music production gear; participants may bring their own instruments, but this is optional.

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Receive an introduced to sampling and recording techniques through community-based improvisation and audio journaling.
  • Work together and support one another in creating a community-based recording.
  • Come away with a recording of a complete song built from the manipulated sounds generated during the improvisation session

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Using the iPad to make music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the Instructors
Kevin Cardoso is an analog hacker at heart and this nature has driven him to explore a variety of art forms that include wood, metal, paper, clay, music, and electronics. As a creative arts therapist, he has experience teaching people of various age groups and abilities. He feels that patience and flexibility is an important approach to help people loosen up, learn, engage with the process, and find satisfaction with their work.

Ben Turner is a musician and songwriter, and these interests have driven him to embrace the manipulation of sound in the home recording studio. He is a music therapist, with a background in various age groups and populations. He attended the College of Wooster and the Cleveland Music Therapy Consortium. He believes that improvisation and audio recording are great platforms for embracing innate musicality, and integrating the head and the heart.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Creating and defining the artifact
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: Getting familiar with gear: Hardware and software
December 14, 2019

About the workshop
There are many things to consider when deciding what to use to record and manipulate sound. Selecting recording software and the hardware is often an experiment within itself and basic gear knowledge can eliminate some of the guesswork involved. In this workshop, participants will be introduced to Cakewalk, a music production software package suitable for novices (software information available at https://www.bandlab.com/products/cakewalk/).

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Learn about various software tools that can be used to manipulate sound, with an emphasis on the music production software Cakewalk
  • Learn about the basics of music production hardware; details will be covered in a handout.
  • Understand how to connect gear, which includes dos and don’ts. The process of audio setup will be demystified.
  • Learn how to set up audio tracks and record.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Using the iPad to make music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the Instructors
Kevin Cardoso is an analog hacker at heart and this nature has driven him to explore a variety of art forms that include wood, metal, paper, clay, music, and electronics. As a creative arts therapist, he has experience teaching people of various age groups and abilities. He feels that patience and flexibility is an important approach to help people loosen up, learn, engage with the process, and find satisfaction with their work.

Ben Turner is a musician and songwriter, and these interests have driven him to embrace the manipulation of sound in the home recording studio. He is a music therapist, with a background in various age groups and populations. He attended the College of Wooster and the Cleveland Music Therapy Consortium. He believes that improvisation and audio recording are great platforms for embracing innate musicality, and integrating the head and the heart.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Getting familiar with gear
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: Introduction to granular synthesis
January 18, 2020

About the workshop
Granular synthesis, based on the same principle as sampling, is a basic sound synthesis method that operates on the microsound time scale. The samples in granular synthesis are segmented into small pieces, called grains, that can be layered on top of one another and can be played at different speeds, phases, volume, and frequency. Greek composer Iannis Xenakis is known as the inventor of the granular synthesis technique and was the first to explicate a compositional theory for grains of sound. Canadian composer Barry Truax was one of the first to implement real-time versions of this synthesis technique.

In this workshop, participants will explore the fundamental concepts of granular synthesis through the use of various software, theory, historical background, and seminal recordings. We will explore both synthesis of granular sound as well as granular processing techniques. Participants will use the audio programming language ‘MAX/MSP’ to build custom granular software and will also explore a host of popular free plug-ins usable in any DAW on any operating system.

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the Instructor
Owen Hopper is a Cincinnati Ohio based composer, sound artist, guitarist, computer programmer, and improviser. His music explores the relationships between the space it is recorded and presented in. He is currently an Adjunct Instructor at the University of Cincinnati.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Intro to granular synthesis
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi (Part I)
January 25, 2020

About the workshop
About the workshop: this two-session workshop explores the creation and performance of computer-generated music utilizing the free music programming language, Sonic Pi. The workshop provides a very gentle introduction to both computer programming and digital music production. Sonic Pi is fun and easy to learn. Consequently, it is a great first step for anyone interested in computer-generated music. The workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Basic computer programming with Sonic Pi
  • Samples
  • Software Synthesizers
  • Audio Effects
  • Randomization
  • Algorithmic composition and improvisation using live coding

Required
Workshop attendees should bring a laptop with Sonic Pi installed. Sonic Pi is available free for Windows, Mac and Linux systems at http://sonic-pi.net. The workshop will not assume any specific knowledge of computer programming or music theory. The workshop is appropriate for adults as well as younger learners (middle school and up). NOTE: The second session of the workshop will be held on Saturday, October 12 from 1-4pm.

About Sonic Pi
Sonic Pi is an open source music programming language designed specifically for live coding and other algorithmic music performances. It provides an elegant and easy-to-use environment for writing computer code that manipulates sounds generated from a library of samples and a large set of built-in synthesizers. Sonic Pi was developed by Sam Aaron at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. It is available free for the Windows, Mac OS X and Linux operating systems. It is part of the standard Raspberry Pi software distribution.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)
  • Using the iPad to make music

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the instructor
Michael Perkins is a technologist, musician and philosopher with special interests in discrete mathematics, data science, and algorithmic music and art. He is a graduate of Georgia State University where he studied music and philosophy and The Ohio State University where he studied philosophy and computer science. He completed a Ph.D. in Philosophy at The Ohio State University in 1983. For 35 years, Michael has developed advanced software systems for some of the world’s leading software vendors. He has designed and implemented special-purpose programming languages, data management tools, application generators, cross-platform networking software, and IT systems management software.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi (Part II)
February 01, 2020

About the workshop
About the workshop: this two-session workshop explores the creation and performance of computer-generated music utilizing the free music programming language, Sonic Pi. The workshop provides a very gentle introduction to both computer programming and digital music production. Sonic Pi is fun and easy to learn. Consequently, it is a great first step for anyone interested in computer-generated music. The workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Basic computer programming with Sonic Pi
  • Samples
  • Software Synthesizers
  • Audio Effects
  • Randomization
  • Algorithmic composition and improvisation using live coding

Required
Workshop attendees should bring a laptop with Sonic Pi installed. Sonic Pi is available free for Windows, Mac and Linux systems at http://sonic-pi.net. The workshop will not assume any specific knowledge of computer programming or music theory. The workshop is appropriate for adults as well as younger learners (middle school and up). NOTE: The first session of the workshop will be held on Saturday, January 21 from 1-3pm.

About Sonic Pi
Sonic Pi is an open source music programming language designed specifically for live coding and other algorithmic music performances. It provides an elegant and easy-to-use environment for writing computer code that manipulates sounds generated from a library of samples and a large set of built-in synthesizers. Sonic Pi was developed by Sam Aaron at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. It is available free for the Windows, Mac OS X and Linux operating systems. It is part of the standard Raspberry Pi software distribution.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)
  • Using the iPad to make music

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the instructor
Michael Perkins is a technologist, musician and philosopher with special interests in discrete mathematics, data science, and algorithmic music and art. He is a graduate of Georgia State University where he studied music and philosophy and The Ohio State University where he studied philosophy and computer science. He completed a Ph.D. in Philosophy at The Ohio State University in 1983. For 35 years, Michael has developed advanced software systems for some of the world’s leading software vendors. He has designed and implemented special-purpose programming languages, data management tools, application generators, cross-platform networking software, and IT systems management software.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00