Annual Exhibition 2019 Call for Entries
September 09, 2019 - September 30, 2019

CALL FOR ENTRIES
Deadline: September 30, 2019

We are pleased to announce our Call for Entries for the Annual Juried Exhibition 2019: TechnoMEME 2. Our juried exhibition features work created with technology-based new media, electronic, and digital tools. Our upcoming exhibition will run from Friday, November 1st to Saturday, December 7th at the Cultural Arts Center, Columbus Ohio.

EXHIBITION THEME

TechnoMEME is the theme of Fuse Factory Annual Exhibitions (FFE) in 2018 and 2019. Following the successful invitational exhibition last year, FFE 2019 continually searches for other artists’ creative interpretations of this theme. Since the concept of evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins’ ‘Meme’, which considered cultural transmissions and imitations as phenomena of self-replication for being an effective propagator of genes according to his book The Selfish Gene (1976), the ambiguous and metaphorical idea from its theoretical beginning has unintentionally morphed into new viral phenomena, such as the trend of the ‘Internet meme’ within online media culture. For this year’s theme, the Fuse Factory looks back at Dawkins’ original term and reviews the usefulness of a meme’s imitation, transmission, retention, and mutation that can be applied and utilized in contemporary art, technology, and culture.

FFE 2019 is considering how new media art translates the ongoing technological phenomena of replication, imitation, variation, reproduction, and mutation responding to technological evolution at the nexus of digital culture. In addition to being the second season of TechnoMEME, FFE 2019 views artistic possibilities of technological and biological matters and platforms that create cultural and behavioral practice as ‘human-nonhuman-meme’, which can be enabled to transmit and replicate between human scientific endeavors and nature. Here is one of many references although this case is a very rare type of animal behaviors and abilities responding human culture. The rhythmic cockatoo Snowball’s spontaneous reactions and humanlike dance would enable us to rethink about human uniqueness and appreciation of nonhuman others.

These artistic explorations can operate as correlative phenomena for intercommunications and interrelationships rather than reinforcing anthropomorphic consciousness and humanized one-way relationships. We seek to include artworks that examine the following:

  • How could we as artists imagine how imitable human consciousness, intelligence, and behavior can connect on par with nonhuman nature and vice versa, or in terms of interspecies?
  • How can we as artists imagine humans as social, cultural, and biological entities, and technological propagators, which can increase understanding of nonhuman others?
  • Moreover, based on the assumption of Dawkins’ claim, the gene-centered view of evolution, how can human genes and memes be transmitted into technological hosts, “surviving machines” and “vehicles”, for leaping from human into hybrids, and surpassing conventional parameters of human nature?
  • How could we sustain humanity?

Here is the list of keywords regarding the theme of FFE2019 – TechnoMEME 2:
- Transmission, imitation, replication, variation, mutation, reproduction, propagator, selfish vs. altruistic, compatibility, co-creation, intercommunication, interrelationship, multispecies, trans-species, interspecies, humanized vs. dehumanized, symbiosis, evolution, technoculture…

ELIGIBILITY

The Fuse Factory Art and Technology Lab encourages all artists, inventors, and scientists working with a wide range of high and low technologies to submit works that fall within the following genres: electronic art; interactive installation and interfaces; robotic art; live performance; 3D modeling and animation; art games; virtual and augmented reality; experimental video and moving images; video mapping; digital imaging; sound art; Internet art; creative coding; biological art; eco-art; and other emerging forms not mentioned here. We will also consider traditional forms of art and film, provided that they also explore the exhibition theme.

Both U.S.-based and international applicants are encouraged to submit entries. If you are an international applicant and your work is composed of physical components and/or physical installations that require an international delivery cost, the jurors will need to take this into consideration when evaluating your artwork for inclusion in the exhibition. While we will do what we can, we cannot guarantee that we can cover your shipping costs if your work is accepted. Please feel free to contact our Executive Director, Alison Colman, at alison@thefusefactory.org if you have any questions or concerns.

  • Artworks that were produced before 2017 will not be considered.
  • Selected artwork must be exhibited during the full month-long exhibition period. However, performative artwork will be scheduled to occur at a specific time and place during the exhibition.

HOW TO SUBMIT

Applicants are required to submit the following:

  • Email your application materials to alison@thefusefactory.org and include “FFE 2019 APPLICATION_your name” in the subject line.
  • 3-5 images (website links only)
  • Video links (3-minutes-or-less video highlights on YouTube or Vimeo. If your application videos exist on private channels, please include passwords so jurors can access your links)
  • Short art statement (300-500 words, .pdf file) describing what you propose to exhibit and how your artwork fits within to the exhibition theme
  • CV
  • One-page (.pdf file) document specifying your installation requirements and dimensions, and other technical requests
  • Contact details (email, phone, website)

TIMELINE

  • Application deadline: Monday, September 30th
  • Notify artists: Saturday, October 5th
  • Announcement for lineup: Monday, October 7th
  • Installation: Wednesday, October 30th – Thursday, October 31st
  • Exhibition duration: Friday, November 1st – Saturday, December 7th
  • Opening Reception: Friday, November 8th
  • De-installation and Art pick-up: Saturday, December 7th
  • NOTE: The Fuse Factory may be able to partially reimburse a limited number of artists (on a case-by-case basis) for the shipping costs they incur by participating in the exhibition. Please contact us to discuss about the supports.

ENTRY FEES/DONATIONS

  • There is no entry fee, but we will gratefully accept donations.
  • The Fuse Factory is a not-for-profit art 501c3 organization, and all of our programming is made possible by grants, sponsorships, and donations.
  • PayPal donations can be made to alison@thefusefactory.org

JURY MEMBERS

  • Tyler Cann – Curator of Contemporary Art at Columbus Museum of Art
  • Amy Youngs – New media artist/Associate professor of Art & Technology, The Ohio State University
  • Doo-Sung Yoo – New media artist/Senior Lecturer of Art & Technology, The Ohio State University

EXHIBITION SUPPORTERS

  • The Puffin West Foundation
  • Cultural Arts Center, Columbus Ohio

For additional information and questions regarding the exhibition application and workshops, please send us an email to alison@thefusefactory.org. We are also on Facebook. For additional information regarding the gallery space of Cultural Arts Center, please visit https://www.culturalartscenteronline.org/ or contact TABaillieul@columbus.gov.

Performance: Kyle Motl (CA) + Sun Trash (CMH) + Gerard Cox (CMH)
September 20, 2019

On the evening of Friday, September 20th we are proud to present bassist/composer/improviser Kyle Motl (NYC) and multi-instrumentalist Caleb Miller and Nick Weckman’s experimental electronic duo project Sun Trash (CMH); additional performers tbd. Doors 7:30, BYOB, all ages. $5-$10.

About the artists:

Kyle Motl is a bassist, composer, and improviser dedicated to the performance of creative music. His work explores aspects of chaos and complexity through involved rhythmic and spectral transformations while remaining grounded in an embodied approach to performance. Kyle regularly gives solo concerts which expand upon the vast timbral resources of the contrabass. Kyle is active in a number of ensembles across the field of creative and improvised music, including Sibarg Ensemble (improvisation at the intersection of jazz and classical Persian music), Peter Kuhn Trio, Abbey Rader Trio and Quartet, Kyle Motl Trio, and Treesearch with Keir GoGwilt. His trio record with Kjell Nordeson and Tobin Chodos, Panjandrums, appeared on Best-of-2017 lists on the Free Jazz Blog and Perfect Sound Forever. He maintains regular duo projects with Keir GoGwilt, Drew Ceccato, TJ Borden, and Tommy Babin. Kyle has performed and recorded alongside artists including Anthony Davis, Kidd Jordan, Mary Halvorson, Roscoe Mitchell, and Wadada Leo Smith, among others. Touring frequently, Kyle’s music has been performed at numerous venues, festivals, and conferences, including the International Society of Bassists Convention, the Darmstadt Fereinkurse, Bass2018 Lucca, the International Society for Improvised Music Conference, NUNC!3, Festival Internacional de Música Experimental, and the Subtropics biannual.

Sun Trash is process music/friendship duo of Nick Weckman and Caleb Miller based in Columbus, OH. We strive to make something together.

Gerard Cox (b. 1976) is a pianist and drummer from Columbus with a keen interest in musical surrealism and the percussive nature of the piano. Born to a piano teacher Mom and a jazz saxophone hobbyist father, clear “rockstar” inclinations were shown at age 8 in an appearance as J.S. Bach at an OMTA music festival and at 10 as Billy Idol in a look-a-like contest for the national pop/rock magazine Star Hits. Cox developed a love for jazz in high school on through college, studying both jazz piano and B3 organ. While initially taken with the straight-ahead jazz of Art Blakey and Clifford Brown, he followed John Coltrane’s discography into his later period music and this proved to be the gateway for a fascination with free jazz and all kinds of other outsider/experimental music.

The Science of Sound: Introduction to the Physics and Mathematics of Music
September 25, 2019

About the workshop
This workshop, which is the first in our Science of Sound series, will provide a high-level overview of the physics and mathematics of musical sound. We will explore the physical phenomena of sound waves and how these waves are captured and interpreted by the human auditory system. We will examine, moreover, how these principles help us understand how acoustic and electronic musical instruments work. Finally, we will look at some of the mathematical structures that underly traditional Western and many non-Western scales and harmonic systems.

Though a basic familiarity with musical notation and elementary mathematics will be helpful for some of the more advanced topics, every participant, regardless of background, will find something of value in the course. The instructor will illustrate the underlying physical and mathematical principles of sound using computer animation, sound synthesis, and live acoustic musical instruments.

The following topics will be covered:

  • Sound, vibration, and waves
  • Some characteristics of sound waves (frequency and pitch, amplitude and intensity)
  • The human auditory system (ear anatomy, the brain and the subjective experience of sound)
  • The behavior of sound waves (sound wave interaction: interference and beats, acoustics)
  • Musical Instruments (systems of pitch manipulation, timbre and harmonics, introduction to the principles of musical sound synthesis)
  • Musical intervals as integer ratios (just intervals, consonance and dissonance)
  • How to build a scale (Pythagoras and just interval scales, equal temperament)

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Using the iPad to make music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the Instructor
Michael Perkins, Ph.D. is a technologist, musician and philosopher with special interests in discrete mathematics, data science, and algorithmic music and art. He is a graduate of Georgia State University where he studied music and philosophy and The Ohio State University where he studied philosophy and computer science. He completed a Ph.D. in Philosophy at The Ohio State University in 1983. For 35 years, Michael has developed advanced software systems for some of the world’s leading software vendors. He has designed and implemented special-purpose programming languages, data management tools, application generators, cross-platform networking software, and IT systems management software.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Physics and Mathematics of Music
Registration for one kit
$25.00

October 2019 Frequency Fridays: Nate Young (DET) + Miralia/Stranahan duo (CLE) + Giant Claw (CMH) + Eddy Kwon (CINCY)
October 04, 2019

Our October 2019 Frequency Fridays show features experimental electronic musician Nate Young, electroacoustic improvisors Miralia/Stranahan duo, composer/violinist/violist Eddy Kwon, and experimental electronic musician/sound artist Keith Rankin’s solo project Giant Claw. Date: Friday, June 7th 2019. Location: 13 E. Tulane Rd. 43202. Admission: $10 for one, $15 for two. Doors open 7:30pm. All ages, BYOB. Our Frequency Fridays 2018-2019 season is supported by grants from the Greater Columbus Arts Council, the Ohio Arts Council, and the Columbus Foundation.

About the artists:

Nate Young Nate Young is a Detroit-based musician who has been working in experimental electronic sound for over twenty years. In 1998, Young founded legendary noise group Wolf Eyes. Solo and as Wolf Eyes, Young has toured the world, released countless records, collaborated with Anthony Braxton and Marshall Allen, and inspired a generation of electronic musicians. Recent accomplishments include performing his compositions with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, and creating Trip Metal Fest, an annual free experimental music festival in Detroit entering its fourth year of programming that has brought luminaries such as Morton Subotnick and the Art Ensemble of Chicago to Detroit. In 2016, Young co-created (with John Olson) the record label Lower Floor Music, an imprint of Warp Records.

The Miralia/Stranahan Duo creates innovative and dynamic soundscapes using both ancient and modern acoustic and electronic instruments. They draw influences from the avant-garde, free improvisation, experimental noise, metal, musique concrete, and ambient musics, but the results are wholly original and will never be reproduced exactly the same way again.

Eddy Kwon is a composer-performer, violinist/violist, and community-based teaching artist living in Cincinnati, Ohio. Eddy is a City of Cincinnati Art Ambassador Fellow, a Cincinnatus Presidential Scholar, and a 2016 United States Artists Ford Fellow. Eddy serves as Artistic Director of Price Hill Will, a non-profit comprehensive community development corporation serving the diverse neighborhood of Price Hill, where Eddy also lives. As a violinist/violist and improviser, Eddy has worked with Roscoe Mitchell, Famoudou Don Moye, Akua Dixon, Napoleon Maddox, Tomeka Reid, Nicole Mitchell, and Jens Lekman. Eddy is currently recording and touring with the Art Ensemble of Chicago, Tomeka Reid, and co-creating a long-term interdisciplinary performance project with artist Senga Nengudi and Degenerate Art Ensemble. As a composer-performer, Eddy works primarily in solo and small ensemble forms. Recent commissions include VIOLENCE, a performance work for electro-acoustic ensemble that explores structural violence in America, and a r c h i p e l a g o, a unison piece for electric string quartet experiencing extreme sensory deprivation (Contemporary Arts Center).

In the music he makes as Giant Claw, Keith Rankin distills the erratic world of 21st century internet culture into a string of increasingly strange albums issued by Orange Milk, the Ohio-based label he co-runs with fellow musician, Seth Graham. Using melodic keyboard lines, plunderphonic sampling, and incessant jump cuts, Giant Claw sketches out a jagged topography of the digital landscape. Over the last seven years, his music has incorporated everything from vintage movie synth scores to footwork and chiptune. After an initial string of decidedly less-bizarre albums, Giant Claw veered into stranger territory on his last two outings. 2014’s Dark Web turned split-second online trope samples into snappy juke rhythms, and 2015’s Deep Thoughts used video game sounds to create odd MIDI symphonies. His latest effort, Soft Channel, is both far more unsettling and decidedly more intimate. While he’s still dissecting a mass of samples and digital instruments, the source material is much more personal. Or to put it in Giant Claw’s own internet-informed parlance: If Dark Web was a Reddit page curated by a long list of users, Soft Channel is a Tumblr page.

The Science of Sound: Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi (Part I)
October 05, 2019

About the workshop
About the workshop: this two-session workshop explores the creation and performance of computer-generated music utilizing the free music programming language, Sonic Pi. The workshop provides a very gentle introduction to both computer programming and digital music production. Sonic Pi is fun and easy to learn. Consequently, it is a great first step for anyone interested in computer-generated music. The workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Basic computer programming with Sonic Pi
  • Samples
  • Software Synthesizers
  • Audio Effects
  • Randomization
  • Algorithmic composition and improvisation using live coding

Required
Workshop attendees should bring a laptop with Sonic Pi installed. Sonic Pi is available free for Windows, Mac and Linux systems at http://sonic-pi.net. The workshop will not assume any specific knowledge of computer programming or music theory. The workshop is appropriate for adults as well as younger learners (middle school and up). NOTE: The second session of the workshop will be held on Saturday, October 12 from 1-4pm.

About Sonic Pi
Sonic Pi is an open source music programming language designed specifically for live coding and other algorithmic music performances. It provides an elegant and easy-to-use environment for writing computer code that manipulates sounds generated from a library of samples and a large set of built-in synthesizers. Sonic Pi was developed by Sam Aaron at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. It is available free for the Windows, Mac OS X and Linux operating systems. It is part of the standard Raspberry Pi software distribution.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)
  • Using the iPad to make music

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the instructor
Michael Perkins is a technologist, musician and philosopher with special interests in Buddhist philosophy, discrete mathematics, data science, contemporary jazz, and algorithmic music. He is a graduate of Georgia State University where he studied music and philosophy and The Ohio State University where he studied philosophy and computer science. He completed a Ph.D. in Philosophy at The Ohio State University in 1983. For 35 years, Michael has developed advanced software systems for some of the world’s leading software vendors. He has designed and implemented special-purpose programming languages, data management tools, application generators, cross-platform networking software, and IT systems management software. Currently, Michael is Chief Scientist for Prosper Technologies, where he designs and implements software systems for integrating, analyzing and visualizing complex sets of data.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

Performance: Thollem McDonas (NM) + Manos (CMH) + Yul Brynner's Ghost (CMH)
October 05, 2019

On the evening of Saturday, October 5th we are proud to present improviser/keyboardist/composer Thollem McDonas (NM) and experimental ambient trio Manos (CMH). Additional performers TBD. Doors 7:30, BYOB, all ages. $5-$10.

About the artists:

Thollem is a perpetually traveling pianist, keyboardist, composer, improviser, singer-songwriter, activist, author and teacher. He’s spent his life skirting and erasing the edges of boundaries musically, culturally and geographically. His work is ever-changing, evolving and responding to the times and his experiences, both as a soloist and in collaboration with hundreds of artists across idioms and disciplines. Thollem’s known internationally as an acoustic piano player in the free jazz and post-classical worlds, as the lead vocalist for the Italian agit-punk band Tsigoti and as an electronic keyboardist through a multitude of projects.

Exploring the sonic fringes of psychedelia, kraut rock, ambient, drone and noise, the Columbus, Ohio collective Manos formed in the fall of 2017, inspired to create “cosmic music for a hallucinatory reality”. Consisting of solo artist Deckard Croix along with John Godshalk and Larry Durica (Floorian) and Jacquie Sanborn (Wake the Trees), Manos released their self-titled debut album in February of 2019.

The Science of Sound: Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi (Part II)
October 12, 2019

About the workshop
About the workshop: this two-session workshop explores the creation and performance of computer-generated music utilizing the free music programming language, Sonic Pi. The workshop provides a very gentle introduction to both computer programming and digital music production. Sonic Pi is fun and easy to learn. Consequently, it is a great first step for anyone interested in computer-generated music. The workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Basic computer programming with Sonic Pi
  • Samples
  • Software Synthesizers
  • Audio Effects
  • Randomization
  • Algorithmic composition and improvisation using live coding

Required
Workshop attendees should bring a laptop with Sonic Pi installed. Sonic Pi is available free for Windows, Mac and Linux systems at http://sonic-pi.net. The workshop will not assume any specific knowledge of computer programming or music theory. The workshop is appropriate for adults as well as younger learners (middle school and up). NOTE: The first session of the workshop will be held on Saturday, January 21 from 1-3pm.

About Sonic Pi
Sonic Pi is an open source music programming language designed specifically for live coding and other algorithmic music performances. It provides an elegant and easy-to-use environment for writing computer code that manipulates sounds generated from a library of samples and a large set of built-in synthesizers. Sonic Pi was developed by Sam Aaron at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory in collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. It is available free for the Windows, Mac OS X and Linux operating systems. It is part of the standard Raspberry Pi software distribution.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)
  • Using the iPad to make music

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the instructor
Michael Perkins is a technologist, musician and philosopher with special interests in Buddhist philosophy, discrete mathematics, data science, contemporary jazz, and algorithmic music. He is a graduate of Georgia State University where he studied music and philosophy and The Ohio State University where he studied philosophy and computer science. He completed a Ph.D. in Philosophy at The Ohio State University in 1983. For 35 years, Michael has developed advanced software systems for some of the world’s leading software vendors. He has designed and implemented special-purpose programming languages, data management tools, application generators, cross-platform networking software, and IT systems management software. Currently, Michael is Chief Scientist for Prosper Technologies, where he designs and implements software systems for integrating, analyzing and visualizing complex sets of data.

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Exploring Algorithmic Music with Sonic Pi Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

Performance: Hypnagogue (MA) + Envenomist (CMH) + The Jesus Fish Experience (CMH)
October 12, 2019

On the evening of Saturday, October 12th we are proud to present James Rosato’s experimental ambient project Hypnagogue (MA), David Reed’s dark ambient solo project Envenomist (CMH), and experimental electronic multi-instrumentalist Reon Moebius’ solo project The Jesus Fish Experience. Doors 7:30, BYOB, all ages. $5-$10.

About the artists:

Hypnagogue is the ambient/experimental project of James Rosato, who is based in Massachusetts.

Some people equate Envenomist with science fiction film scores, and others envision solitary nocturnal travels through bleak urban settings, but a fundamental strength of Envenomist is that these illusory backdrops remain open to interpretation. Taking inspiration from industrial, ambient, and the kosmische scenes along with altered states of consciousness, the oceanic abyss, and deep space, David Reed has been producing desolate soundscapes under the Envenomist moniker since 2005. Highlights in the discography include Abyssal Siege, Bound Dominions, and Bleeding Out.

The Science of Sound: Introduction to Musique Concrète with Audacity part I
October 19, 2019

About the workshop
Musique Concrète was one of the original approaches to electronic music composition, pioneered by Pierre Schaeffer in the 1940s. It relied on recording natural sounds and manipulating them on tape, and its techniques have been incorporated into a wide variety of music ever since, from John Cage to hip-hop DJing/scratching. Today, this approach is no longer dependent on tape recording technology – free audio editing software such as Audacity allows this practice to be explored by anyone with a computer (software information available at https://www.audacityteam.org/).

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Learn about the history and original tape techniques of traditional Musique Concrète, and their ongoing application in both avant garde classical music and popular culture.
  • Hear examples of how composers have used these techniques to create electronic music
  • Learn how to install and configure the free Audacity software on their laptops
  • Learn the basic techniques of audio editing (cutting, splicing, mixing) and manipulation (pitch/time shifting, reverse, effects)
  • Create their own compositions using found sounds, the aesthetic principles of Musique Concrète, and the powerful editing capabilities of a modern audio editing tool.
  • Learn about how to use these techniques in other contexts, and about other software and educational resources available to expand their practice of electronic music.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)
  • Using the iPad to make music

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the instructor
Bbob Drake has been creating experimental music and audio in Cleveland for the last 45 years. From a start as a guitarist, his current focus is on electro-acoustic improvisation in both solo and group settings. His solo work spans a range from “lowercase” or “onkyokei” aesthetics (quiet, minimalist, abstract), to free jazz and more aggressive noise genres. He designs and builds the majority of his own instruments, both electronic synthesizers and original electo-acoustic designs. bbob has lead workshops in experimental electronics for music at Spaces and other venues, and he designs and sells printed circuit boards for DIY synthesizer enthusiasts. bbob’s most recent recorded releases are “Failure Cake” (solo CD) and “Curiouser” (with Cleveland drummer J. Guy Laughlin)

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below:

Introduction to Musique Concrete Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

The Science of Sound: Introduction to Musique Concrète with Audacity part II
October 26, 2019

About the workshop
Musique Concrète was one of the original approaches to electronic music composition, pioneered by Pierre Schaeffer in the 1940s. It relied on recording natural sounds and manipulating them on tape, and its techniques have been incorporated into a wide variety of music ever since, from John Cage to hip-hop DJing/scratching. Today, this approach is no longer dependent on tape recording technology – free audio editing software such as Audacity allows this practice to be explored by anyone with a computer (software information available at https://www.audacityteam.org/).

In this introductory hands-on workshop, participants will:

  • Learn about the history and original tape techniques of traditional Musique Concrète, and their ongoing application in both avant garde classical music and popular culture.
  • Hear examples of how composers have used these techniques to create electronic music
  • Learn how to install and configure the free Audacity software on their laptops
  • Learn the basic techniques of audio editing (cutting, splicing, mixing) and manipulation (pitch/time shifting, reverse, effects)
  • Create their own compositions using found sounds, the aesthetic principles of Musique Concrète, and the powerful editing capabilities of a modern audio editing tool.
  • Learn about how to use these techniques in other contexts, and about other software and educational resources available to expand their practice of electronic music.

About the Science of Sound workshop series
The primary purposes of this series is to provide introductory-level, hands-on instruction in electronic music making over a range of approaches and to demystify electronic music and electronic music composition. This workshop series is not centered around learning specific technologies or electronic music generating equipment as such, or learning the newest technologies for their own sake; instead, they will learn how to learn new tools. Particular technologies and applications introduced in the series will play a supporting role in teaching participants the fundamentals of sound and the physics of sound as it pertains to experimental and electronic music making.

This workshop series is divided into four sections covering the various approaches contemporary electronic musicians and composers take regarding the technologies they prefer to utilize:

  • Fundamentals of physics, mathematics and music
  • Introduction to coding and open source computer applications
  • Exploring electronic music equipment and gear (pedals, controllers, field recording equipment, etc.)
  • Using the iPad to make music

This workshop series is supported by an Arts Partnership grant from the Ohio Arts Council.

About the instructor
Bbob Drake has been creating experimental music and audio in Cleveland for the last 45 years. From a start as a guitarist, his current focus is on electro-acoustic improvisation in both solo and group settings. His solo work spans a range from “lowercase” or “onkyokei” aesthetics (quiet, minimalist, abstract), to free jazz and more aggressive noise genres. He designs and builds the majority of his own instruments, both electronic synthesizers and original electo-acoustic designs. bbob has lead workshops in experimental electronics for music at Spaces and other venues, and he designs and sells printed circuit boards for DIY synthesizer enthusiasts. bbob’s most recent recorded releases are “Failure Cake” (solo CD) and “Curiouser” (with Cleveland drummer J. Guy Laughlin)

Workshop fees
To reserve a seat in the workshop, please register using the link below (the workshop fee of $35 will enroll you in BOTH parts – no need to register for each part separately):

Introduction to Musique Concrete Parts I + II
Registration for one
$35.00

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